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Patrick Hill

Department
Job Title
(Working) Thesis Title

(Working) Thesis Title

High precision examination of the triple Si-O isotopes of lunar samples 

Thesis Description

It was originally thought that the heterogeneity between the Moon and Earth’s triple oxygen isotopes would provide a direct line of evidence for the giant impact hypothesis, but this was proven contrary when Apollo samples all plotted on the terrestrial fractionation line. However, Herwartz et al. (2014) showed, using three Apollo samples, that there is a 12 ± 3 parts per million difference between the oxygen isotopes of the Moon and Earth. This study will utilize a high precision Si-O laser fluorination line to investigate whether there is any subtle variation between the two planetary bodies by examining the triple isotopes of silicon and oxygen. In addition, lunar meteorites will also be examined to determine if the lunar meteorites are truly representative of the Moon’s chemistry and if the same result can be replicated.

Publications

Publication

Hill P.J.A., Kopylova M. G., Russell J. K. and Cookenboo H. (2014) Mineralogical controls on garnet composition in the cratonic mantle. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology (in review)

Degrees Obtained

Degrees Obtained

M.Sc Geology and Planetary Science

University of Western Ontario

London, ON

Expected 2016

 

B.Sc Honour Geological Science with Distinction

University of British Columbia

Vancouver, BC

May 2014

Thesis Title

Mineralogical controls on garnet composition in the cratonic mantle: evidence from the Canastra 8 kimberlite

Awards & Scholarships

Scholarships and Awards

2014                Ontario Graduate Scholarship

2014                NSERC CREATE Trainee

2014                Dr. Aaro E. Aho Foundation Graduating Scholarship and Gold Medal

2013               Trek Excellence Scholarship for Continuing Students

2013                Shell Award for Excellence in Geological Fieldwork

2012-2013       Endeavour Silver Corporation Undergraduate Scholarship